Software Performance Artifacts in the SDLC

Archeology

Performance artifacts in development

Where are your requirements and development performance artifacts? Over the years of being a performance engineer, I have been involved in a number of projects related to performance and scalability readiness assessments. This involves evaluating the software, either from a vendor or developed in-house, to determine if it has been designed and developed with performance and scalability goals. During this readiness assessment project, myself and the team I work with, will look for non-functional requirements for the key business and system transactions, and development guidelines and artifacts that track or measure service time during the development and unit testing phase. Finding performance early.

Non-Functional requirements

To start, there are non-functional requirements that should have been defined for the development team. The team develops the code to make the business functions real. The next question is where does your Software development lifecycle and methodology (that’s right, I said methodology) have activities and artifacts specific to performance, scalability, and stability? For example, the application needs a change to the pricing calculation, or order history functions, how fast should it be? Where is it specified that it still needs to be 300 milliseconds after the functional change? Initially the non-functional requirements have specified that the pricing calculation must be completed in 300 milliseconds for average complexity and 600 millisecond for complex calculations. Can you point to the artifact(s) where that is defined in your methodology? Before the developer begins coding, is he or she aware of that?
Then we look for guidelines for developers and services provided by a framework. Has the Performance or Architecture team defined a set of guidelines for the developer to use when building this type of service? Is the use of caching been defined, who verifies the database access and SQL statements are optimal? Where is that captured, what artifacts captures this? Does each developer understand the proper use of logging and code instrumentation, or is it part of the development framework? For the case of the Pricing service, each method must measure service time (internal), and each exposed public service must have a service time measurement.

Continuous Integration

A key artifact to look for is the results from the Weekly or daily build process. Are there test results for the internal method calls and external service calls? Junit will support the internal verification and Jmeter can support the external verification. In order to get value from this, the testing database must be robust (not simply single rows with no history). But, how can you use the response results during development to indicate eventual production performance? The value comes from comparing build to build, for instance, did the service time change radically? This can be an early indicator. However, often times the development environment changes or the database changes. The Performance Engineer must show the business there is value by maintaining consistency in the development environment. With a consistent development environment you can show that the service time of the pricing service has significantly changed, well before production.

Key Performance artifact

For the Jmeter test case: For build 1, the Pricing service is measured at 1.000 second. The goal is 300 milliseconds. Or, what if the service time is 100 milliseconds? Then you need to track the service time from build to build to monitor for consistency. If the 100 milliseconds goes to 1.00 second, how did that happen? Did the environment change, did the developer add new code to the function? You must evaluate this, as you found it early.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: